A UFO Watcher Has Spotted A Dark Triangle On The Sun – And It’s Sparked A Wild Theory

Scott Waring is poring through NASA’s close-up images of the Sun when something allegedly catches his eye. The UFO watcher has spent years documenting what he believes is proof of life beyond Earth. Now, he claims to have spotted a mysterious dark triangle seemingly floating just above the surface of the Sun. And if his theory for the triangle’s identity holds true, it may just change everything we thought we knew about the universe.

We’ll return to Waring’s so-called discovery a little later, but first let’s learn a bit more about the star near where he says this UFO was spotted. The Sun is just one of over 100 billion stars that are spread across our galaxy. That makes it pretty unexceptional in the grand scheme of things. But the Sun is incredibly special to us, because it’s the binding force that gives life to our solar system. Eight planets, at least five dwarf planets, tens of thousands of asteroids, and three trillion icy bodies and comets all orbit the energy source.

The ferociously fiery star provides light, heat and energy to Earth. As a result, it sustains all life on our planet. And it’s been doing so for eons, as scientists believe it originally formed around 4.5 billion years ago. The leading theory suggests that a giant gas and dust cloud known as a solar nebula collapsed under its own gravity – spinning and flattening into a disk. That entity then eventually became our solar system.

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Before the planets formed, though, most of the material in the disk gravitated towards its center, and it eventually formed the Sun. Ours isn’t the only example of a so-called protoplanetary disk, however. Scientists have also glimpsed them across the galaxy – often around distant cousins of our Sun. In fact, the European Southern Observatory’s ALMA telescope has spotted at least 20 other instances of these disks.

These distant cousins are younger than our own star, but the Sun is still thought to be relatively youthful in the wider universe. Indeed, it belongs to a group of stars collectively referred to as Population I, which are identifiable by their chemical composition. At least one earlier generation – Population II – has been determined, but scientists believe there may be an even older group known as Population III.

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Our Sun sits at the epicenter of our solar system some 26,000 light-years from the middle of the Milky Way. It is in the Orion Arm – a small pocket of the larger galaxy in which we reside. The Sun orbits the center of the Milky Way once every 230 million years and does so at an astonishing 450,000 miles per hour, according to National Geographic.

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Our Sun is what’s known as a yellow dwarf star, though the moniker is a bit of a misnomer. The star is actually bright white; it only looks yellow to us due to the way light behaves in our atmosphere. Furthermore, it hardly seems worthy of the “dwarf” label all on its own, because it’s almost incomprehensibly huge relative to Earth.

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You see, the Sun spans an incredible 860,000 miles wide. That’s equivalent to the width of the Earth 109 times over, and it means that if the star was hollow you could fit more than one million Earths inside it, according to National Geographic. Given that staggering statistic, it’s probably less surprising to learn that the Sun comprises over 99.8 percent of the solar system’s total mass all on its own.

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You also won’t be shocked to hear that the Sun is incredibly hot. The star’s surface alone is around 10,000 °F, but its core can reach a face-melting 27 million °F – predominantly thanks to the constant nuclear reactions that happen inside the star. And NASA claims that matching the Sun’s energy output would require detonating 100 billion tons of dynamite each second.

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That energy is generated by nuclear fusion within the core, which creates helium from hydrogen. It’s then carried up through the Sun’s layers by photons – or light particles – to what’s known as the convection zone. Finally, oozing plasmas in this layer akin to a lava lamp bring the energy to the surface of the Sun, where it can begin its journey through space.

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Photons can take 170,000 to finally leave the sun, but the process is wholly necessary. Indeed, it’s this procedure that eventually launches these energy storing particles in our direction. And once they have left the Sun, photons race through the galaxy at over 186,000 miles per second – taking roughly eight minutes to reach Earth.

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The Sun’s chemical composition is forever altered by this process of nuclear fusion. At the moment, it’s comprised of around 72 percent hydrogen and 26 percent helium, according to Space.com. The remaining two percent is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, magnesium, carbon, iron, neon and silicon. But as the Sun continues to convert hydrogen to helium, those numbers will change, and the star will eventually run out of hydrogen.

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National Geographic writes that the Sun has currently used approximately 50 percent of the hydrogen in its core. This should last another five billion years or so, at which point it will switch to helium for its main fuel source. When this happens, it will swell to roughly 100 times its size – absorbing Venus, Mercury and possibly Earth. Around a billion years after that it is expected that the Sun will then collapse altogether.

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For now, though, the Sun will continue to burn – providing light and heat to our solar system. We can feel the star’s warmth thanks to its magnetic field, which stretches over 10 billion miles, according to National Geographic. The Sun’s solar wind blows through this field at around 280 miles per second. Beyond its reach lies the cold depths of interstellar space, which has only been breached by two spacecraft: Voyager 1 and Voyager 2.

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Occasionally, the Sun emits a group of particles all at once which burst into space as a solar flare. These cosmic events happen on a calendar dictated by the star’s solar cycle, in which its magnetic field reverses every 11 years. They’re usually caused by cool regions on the Sun’s surface known as sunspots, which are stimulated by the solar cycle. Furthermore, their effects are tangible, as they can interrupt satellites and cause power cuts on Earth.

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The solar cycle can bring as many as 250 sunspots – or clusters of them – to the Sun’s surface. They appear as dark, usually circular features and occur when dense batches of magnetic field lines burst through the star’s outer layer. Scientists have long studied these abnormalities, though they may not explain one UFO watcher’s alleged discovery.

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The Sun has been a point of fascination for civilizations throughout history. Ancient cultures tracked its movements and the seasons, while scholars studied its role in the universe. Greek sage Ptolemy, for example, posited in 150 B.C. that the Sun orbited the Earth. In fact, it wasn’t until 1543 that Nicolaus Copernicus first suggested that the opposite was actually true.

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In the 20th century we began to understand a whole lot more about our solar system’s primary energy source. That’s partly thanks to NASA’s Orbiting Solar Observatory, which launched in eight stages from 1962 to 1971. In the years that followed, the space agency studied the Sun from Earth orbit – analyzing and photographing the star from afar.

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In the early 21st century NASA reached another milestone with its Genesis spacecraft, which collected samples of the Sun’s solar wind. Three years later its Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission captured the first 3D images of the awe-inspiring star. But one of the most crucial expeditions to study the Sun has actually been running since 1995.

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The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite launched in December that year and was the result of cooperation between the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA. It was originally designed to examine the Sun’s solar wind, interior structure and outer layers. In the decades since, it has tracked changes in the star’s magnetic fields, photographed sunspots below its surface and discovered at least 3,000 comets.

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NASA then followed up SOHO in 2010 with its high-tech Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Space.com author Charles Q. Choi wrote seven years later that the vessel is “the most advanced spacecraft yet designed to study the Sun.” It is capturing never-before-seen close-up images of the Sun’s surface and helping scientists improve their understanding of solar and magnetic activity.

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ESA and NASA’s most recent mission to examine the Sun – the Solar Orbiter – launched in early 2020. It made its first close approach to the star four months later and reached a distance of approximately 48 million miles from its surface – or halfway between the Earth and the Sun. The Solar Orbiter will capture images of the Sun’s surface and help scientists understand more about our solar system.

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Traditionally, there have only been two ways to safely view the Sun: by either directly viewing it with a filter over a telescope or projecting its image on paper. But ESA and NASA’s missions have provided scientists with new ways to see and study the star. And they’ve made the images returned from these missions publicly available.

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You can view these astonishing images of the Sun for yourself through Helioviewer.org. The online software launched in 2010 as the result of a collaboration between ESA and NASA. It contains SOHO’s entire catalogue of photographs and daily additions from SDO. The archive is also interactive – allowing users to render movies and track features on the Sun’s surface.

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And it was through the aforementioned software that one UFO watcher claimed to have spotted something extremely unusual on the Sun’s surface. The YouTuber apparently combed through countless images captured by ESA and NASA and said that he’d discovered a mysterious dark triangle that had been hovering above the star for some time. As a result, he has since set about chronicling his alleged discovery in a series of intriguing videos.

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Alien theorist Scott Waring has been posting about UFO sightings on his blog ETDatabase.com since 2018. And in November the year after he published a YouTube video of Helioviewer images that appeared to show a strange dark triangle on the Sun’s surface. Waring wrote in an accompanying blog post, “This is 100 percent proof that aliens exist and NASA isn’t doing its job.”

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But this isn’t the first time black triangles have been associated with alien sightings. In fact, there are decades of reports chronicling apparently mysterious, unidentified objects spotted across North America and Europe filed under the designation “Black Triangles.” These sightings have since been catalogued and studied by the National Institute for Discovery Science (NIDS) – a private organization operating from Las Vegas, Nevada.

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NIDS published a report on these strange aerial phenomena in 2004. And it claimed that the United States was experiencing a “wave of Flying Triangle sightings” that had intensified towards the end of the 20th century. The researchers examined hundreds of reports by eyewitnesses and argued that the unidentified aircraft were likely not covert government vehicles – thereby ruling out one explanation.

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However, these sightings have all occurred relatively close to Earth – unlike the triangle allegedly spotted by Waring. The NIDS report claims that the “Flying Triangles” have mostly been spotted at low altitudes in populated areas. And while their origins remain unknown, that still places them a far cry from the dark triangle that’s apparently hovering over the Sun.

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Nevertheless, the triangle which Waring claims he saw remains equally mysterious. The prominent theorist allegedly first spotted the abnormality in October 2019. He then said that he noticed it again the following month, but the UFO enthusiast apparently realized it had changed course – seemingly reversing the direction of its orbit around the star. He reported on his blog, “The object was moving from left to right of the screen, but now [it’s] moving from right to left! That should be impossible.”

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Waring also published a video on his YouTube channel allegedly demonstrating his discovery. The clip purports to contain images taken from Helioviewer in November 2019 and is overlaid with the software’s green color filter. And it claims to show the ominous black triangle apparently moving over the Sun – independently of the giant star’s own gravitational forces.

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Waring estimated that the triangle was roughly the size of our Moon – due its dimensions in relation the Sun. He also said that its movement was particularly peculiar, because it was allegedly hovering just above – and perhaps even touching – the Sun. The UFO watcher does have his own theory as to what the apparent triangle could be, however.

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Waring made a follow-up video in March 2020 and claimed that the mysterious object is actually “an alien space station that’s in orbit around the Earth’s Sun.” He also alleged that it’s “something that the United States military doesn’t want us to know about.” To support this notion, Waring went on to claim that the Sun seemingly rotates beneath the murky shape.

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Waring claimed that the triangle’s apparent fixed position suggests it isn’t simply a sunspot. He says in the video, “It’s just sitting there. How could this thing be so close to the sun and not be heated up? The fact that it’s black shows us that it’s cold; that it’s not hot. Now, only alien tech can get that close to the Sun without being destroyed.”

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Waring has provided regular updates on the status of the alleged black triangle in the months that have followed. In June 2020 he posted another YouTube clip and this time used four different color filters to display the mysterious shape. In this video, the triangle can be seen jumping around, which Waring suggests could be a result of the “atmosphere around the Sun.”

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The Sun is obviously too hot for any living thing to survive on or near it. But in August 2018 NASA launched the Parker Solar Probe, which the organization describes as “the first-ever mission to ‘touch’ the Sun.” The spacecraft will travel to within four million miles of the star’s surface – bringing it within the star’s atmosphere.

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By June 2020 the Parker Solar Probe had made its fifth successful pass by the Sun – reaching a record proximity of 11.6 million miles. The spacecraft is intended to help scientists better understand how energy particles pass through the star and learn about how they are then released into the wider solar system. Apparently, findings from the fifth journey will become publicly available in November 2020.

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However, the Parker Solar Probe mission – or indeed, NASA itself – has not yet acknowledged Waring’s supposed black triangle. And the blogger has suggested that the organization is attempting to cover up proof of alien life. If the triangle really is an alien object, though, it would need to withstand blistering temperatures.

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Nevertheless, many of Waring’s viewers agree with his wild conclusions. One user wrote, “Seriously though, where are the official explanations or even a skeptic telling us it’s on the camera lens or space debris. Their silence is them confirming it’s real.” And when one user pointed out that “nothing could survive on the Sun,” another rebutted, “Keep in mind ET technology could be far beyond anything we can comprehend.”

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Of course, it’s also possible that the strange triangle is simply a trick of the light or a tiny mark on the telescope’s lens. Without any actual proof or confirmation, then, Waring’s theory that it’s alien in nature should be seriously questioned. After all, the blogger is infamous for his fantastical ideas – many of which have already been proven false by scientists.

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