When A Family Explored Their Dead Relative’s Barn, They Found A Secret Stash Of Vintage Treasures

It’s 2018, and Larry Schroll’s relatives are preparing to explore the barn that he left behind following his passing. As they go in, the family members are greeted by a sea of dusty colors across the space – leaving them floored. Incredibly, Schroll had amassed a huge number of vintage objects prior to his death.

Schroll grew up in Spring Grove, Pennsylvania, alongside his three brothers Russell, Autry and Marvin. He attended the local high school and earned his diploma back in 1954. After that, the graduate’s life took an interesting turn, as he joined the United States military for a spell.

In the end, Schroll got honorably discharged from the service and then returned to Spring Grove. As for his career outside the army, he earned a job at P.H. Glatfelter – a business that manufactures paper. The Pennsylvania native then went on to stay at that company up until his retirement in 2001.

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Away from work, Schroll appeared to have a stable personal life as well, and he tied the knot with a woman named Helen Gruver in the mid-1960s. And Schroll was quite a creative individual when it came to personal pursuits, as he liked to paint and scribe his own poems.

But Schroll had another hobby that few people knew the extent of prior to his passing in July 2018. So, that brings us back to the day when his relatives entered the barn that he left to them. Within moments, the group realized that the 82-year-old had built up a mammoth stockpile of vintage treasures.

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Schroll’s clan then made a big decision after they explored his old barn. Given what the group had found, they looked to put the contents up for auction and sought the advice of an auctioneer. But that individual quickly admitted that he lacked the necessary knowledge about the vintage items.

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So Schroll’s relatives opted to contact a YouTuber named Matt Murray to help them out. He’s in charge of a channel on the social media platform called IronTrap Garage, which studies old automobiles. And Murray seemed like the perfect guy for the job, as the army veteran’s mystery stockpile was made up of 50 eye-popping vehicles, according to Business Insider.

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The publication claims that Schroll purchased the first batch of vehicles in 1961 and then bought more over the next three decades. Meanwhile, Murray shared his thoughts in March 2020 after coming on board with the family. He told the website, “Pretty much anybody [who] walks in there would find something they like – whether you’re a muscle car guy or a hot rod guy.”

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Murray continued, “Everything [Schroll] bought is unique or interesting for one reason or another. You can actually tell why he bought it.” Once the expert was recruited, he then assisted Schroll’s relatives in sorting through the vehicles on the property. And they planned to split them up into groups for separate auctions across 2020.

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To give you an example, the opening group consisted of ten automobiles for a sale in April 2020. But Murray wasn’t just offering his assistance on that front. In addition to aiding the family, he also produced a video series on Schroll’s collection for his YouTube channel – posting the first in February 2020.

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In total, Murray helmed 13 videos about Schroll’s cars, with each one taking a closer look at some of the more notable finds. To begin with, the YouTuber focused on a red vehicle that was surrounded by boxes in the space. Despite its dusty appearance, he quickly indicated that it was a special automobile.

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Murray says, “So this is a ’65 Mustang that basically is loaded with every option. It has the 289 [engine] in it obviously, which is great. [It’s got] factory a/c, factory-powered steering, it has factory disc brakes. It even still has the original factory a/c blower inside of the car with the little Ford logo.”

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In the clip, we get a short glimpse of the vehicle’s bright-red interior, and then Murray shares a few other pieces of information. He continues, “[This is an] amazing untouched car, that is basically as it was driven and then parked right here. Larry owned this car since about 1982, and [it’s] been sitting since about 1982!”

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Murray subsequently reveals that Schroll collected pictures of the cars too, with each snap detailing its past before he bought them. Going back to the Mustang, the YouTuber then drops a surprising bombshell to the camera. The vehicle is apparently more than capable of returning to the road – even though it’s been gathering dust for close to 40 years.

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“This car is like prime [and] ready to go,” Murray explains. “I feel like you could throw some belts on it, pour some gas in, get the thing to fire and run.” He goes on, “This car is the real deal, and if you’re a Mustang guy, this is gonna make you go nuts, because I know it made me go crazy when I first saw it.”

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Murray and his camera crew really dive into the collection – capturing shots of numerous cars sitting around the barn. The host eventually sets his sights on a red 1973 Corvette, and much like the Mustang, he believes that it could be driven again with no hassle.

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However, Murray highlights another fascinating detail while reeling off the car’s attributes. After Schroll purchased the Corvette, he put together a document that recorded all of his trips to the gas station. So, every time the collector topped up his vehicle’s tank between 1977 and 1978, he noted down the date and other bits of information.

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As for the car itself, Murray says that the Corvette has two different types of bumper on the front and the rear. The former is fitted with a plastic bar, while the latter has a metal accessory attached to it. He then reveals that the vehicle is sitting on “aftermarket wheels,” with a few of the tires retaining their shape.

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Overall, it’s a beautiful car that wouldn’t look out of place on the road right now. But after rummaging through the next batch of vehicles, Murray uncovers a couple more gems hiding away on the property. And the first looks to be distinctly different from the rest for a very simple reason.

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Murray says, “This car right here is insanely clean. Now normally you wouldn’t think that a ’79 Ranchero would be something that people would jump up and down about in the classic car hobby. But this car is remarkably clean. It’s under 50,000 miles… and [it] literally smells like a new car when you get inside…”

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“This car was used very minimally,” Murray notes. “We looked in the bed of the Ranchero, and there’s like almost no wear in the bed, which is really incredible. The paint’s really nice, the red interior is a nice contrast with the silver [body], and the fact that it’s the GT edition makes it just a little bit better.”

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Murray then reveals that Schroll kept detailed documents on the Ranchero too – much like the ’73 Corvette. Indeed, the collector had written down which parts he’d got changed after buying the car and had also included photos of it outside the barn. Apparently, it was placed into storage back in 1990.

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To conclude, Murray adds, “Even though [this Ranchero is] not as desirable as some of the earlier models, I think this thing is a winner. If you’re into the Ford muscle car era, this car, because of how remarkably clean it is… is a very good buy.” After this, he then moves on to the second hidden gem.

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This particular vehicle is a 1969 Mustang Grande, and it boasts a similar color to the previous Mustang in the collection. But the car does have some notable differences, too – especially when you peek inside. In fact, the doors’ interior, dashboard and steering wheel all have a slick wooden design.

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Schroll also made sure to keep hold of the records from when he picked the car up back in the 1990s. One of the documents was the original sale ticket, and this revealed that the previous motorist had swapped their ’57 Oldsmobile to get the Mustang Grande. Yet again, it was a fascinating extra to go with the vehicle.

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Murray subsequently shed some light on two of the best vehicles in Schroll’s collection – the first of which is a 1955 Thunderbird. The YouTuber says, “This is probably my favorite car on the whole entire property. This is as stylish of a car as it gets. [It] has a red and white interior [and] a red exterior.”

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Murray then adds, “This car is either all original, or it was restored very very well. You notice that there’s the tags, all the Ford okay check tags and everything on the engine bay. And the interior is extremely clean. It’s a car that I think will take very little work to get on the road.”

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As for the other automobile, Murray flags up a dusty 1954 Corvette. He quickly dubs it as the “coolest car” in Schroll’s barn because it has an uncommon shade on its body. Apparently, just 100 of those vehicles were manufactured with the red exterior – making it a real collector’s item.

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In addition, Murray notes that a new engine had been installed at some point in time – with a small-block Chevy V8 replacing the straight-6. The car expert also highlights that a bit of the trim is gone too. Despite this, though, he can barely contain his joy when describing the Corvette’s condition.

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Murray finishes, “What’s amazing about this car is how complete it is. The car is pretty much all there and it’s not smashed, it’s not banged up, it’s not deteriorated or anything like that. This car is extremely solid, extremely rare. And as far as Corvettes go – C1 Corvettes – a barn find like this is out of this world.”

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After shooting that initial video, a few other details came out when Murray spoke to Business Insider in March 2020. For instance, once the YouTuber agreed to assist Schroll’s relatives, they gave him the green-light to buy two of the cars. The vehicles in question were a 1932 Ford and 1934 Ford Tudor.

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Murray subsequently touched upon the money that Schroll had dropped for some of the automobiles. The expert revealed, “He [was] buying cars that are worth $20,000 now and he paid like $1,000.” Keeping that in mind, the Pennsylvania resident had apparently been particularly proactive in the second half of the 1970s.

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In 1975 Schroll bought some property that came in at around nine-acres, and he then spent the subsequent four years nabbing 21 different cars. As per Business Insider, the collector picked up motors like a 1936 Ford truck, a ’64 Chevrolet Corvair Convertible and a ’69 Thunderbird in that time.

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Murray hailed Schroll’s spending spree when looking back on that period. According to him, the car lover showed real foresight in grabbing the motors while they were so cheap. He told the website, “It was a great investment because he was buying stuff at a time when you could buy these cars for literally pennies on the dollar.”

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Murray continued, “And now… they’re all good cars, but some of the cars [are] pretty good. [So they’re] definitely going to be a pretty good profit for [the family]. It would have taken a lifetime to sell all of this privately one by one.” And alongside the barn, Schroll had another area to spread his collection out.

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Business Insider added that Schroll had invested in storage space, too, as he aimed to shield some of his cars from the elements. Not only that, but the automobile enthusiast could keep the full extent of his buying under wraps. And that might explain why his relatives were so shocked by what they found.

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Murray told the publication, “[Schroll] bought [the cars], put [them] in the building, and closed the door and never touched them again. When I’m opening the hood on these cars or the doors on them, [it’s] like it’s the first time they’d been open since he opened them. These were all hidden like his family didn’t really know what he had.”

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Meanwhile, Murray hit back at the bad reputation that comes with collecting numerous objects as well. He added, “There is a negative hoarder, but [Schroll] wasn’t keeping empty cat food. He was keeping collectable antique cars around and car parts, which now the family’s going to benefit from very greatly.”

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Speaking of the money, Murray made a prediction about how much Schroll’s clan could bring in at the auctions. In his opinion, a large chunk of the collection would sell for up to $10,000 each. But he believed that a few of the models might be worth even more than that: from $20,000 to $50,000.

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For its part, IronTrap Garage produced a video in August 2020 from one of the later auctions. Fifteen of Schroll’s cars were put up for sale that day – with a 1950 Mercury Lead Sled earning the most at $19,000. Overall, those lots reportedly brought in more than $107,000 for his family.

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