Image: Donovan Nelson via Face2Face Africa

It’s May 1803, and a boat full of captive Igbo people is making its way along the Georgia coast. Having survived the perilous journey across the Atlantic Ocean, they are en route to St. Simons Island to begin a life of slavery. Suddenly they rise up, breaking free of their chains at last. But more white men wait for them on the land, leading the Igbo to make an impossible choice.

By the beginning of the 19th century, slavery had been practiced in the United States for almost two centuries. Over the years, the demand for slaves had increased as the population had grown. Many men had made their fortunes shipping captives from Africa to sell to households and plantations across the country.

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