It’s March 1944, and the Second World War rumbles on. At this time, the Allied assault on northern France is just a matter of weeks away. But all is not well with the invasion force’s supreme commander, five-star general Dwight D. Eisenhower. You see, the man many would come to know as Ike is in a bitter dispute with Britain’s wartime leader, Prime Minister Winston Churchill. And Eisenhower is so angered by the clash that he’s contemplating drastic action – a maneuver, in fact, that could entirely change the course of WWII.

Yet D-Day – the famous attack by sea and land on Normandy – did of course go ahead on June 6, 1944. The massive operation had been meticulously planned for months on end, too. But discussions about the precise timing of the invasion had been intense – at times even acrimonious. And that’s perhaps not a surprise, as tentative geopolitical alliances were at stake.

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